Category Archives: Nomadic Travels

Sounds of Travel | Pogo – ‘Indian Pacific’ Remix

images (4)It’s one thing to document your travels through photos and the elusive vortex of Instagram (it always sucks me in,) but YouTube mixer Pogo decided to document his latest journey via sound.

Simply titled, Indian Pacific Remix,” Pogo beautifully mixed together the sounds of his trip along the Indian Pacific railway. The result? A chill downtempo track that could be the recipe for starting off the morning with a cup of joe.

I’ve heard the Indian Pacific train is a great trip to take and it’s a long journey, so Pogo surely had a lot of sounds to work with. Check it out below.

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Empty America Series | Ever Wondered What American Cities Would Look Like Empty? *New Cities Added*


Throughout my travels I’ve had the opportunity to visit or at least venture through different cities. I’ve walked throughout Manhattan, all the way from downtown to uptown. I’ve driven through Atlanta, Indianapolis, Cleveland, Cincinnati  Philadelphia, Las Vegas,  Charlotte, Omaha, Los Angeles, Pasadena, Kansas City, Memphis, Birmingham, and so many more cities.

But, I never imagined what a city would look like empty.

Could you imagine a city without people? An eerie post-apocalyptic vision of a city, except without any destruction or trash. Clean empty cities with no presence of human life except for the creativity of architecture and design. Nothing is in motion, except the wind and the changes of the environment such as lighting and shadows casted by the sun playing with buildings.

Well, in this riveting new timelapse series called Empty America, Ross Ching shows us his vision of empty American cities. The first video shows us what San Francisco would look like if nobody existed, and the timelapse work is beautiful. It’s an eerie beautiful quality that allows you to reflect on the life of the city; imagine the buildings are characters in a story waiting to be told.

Oh, and if you’re wondering how on earth he was able to make the cities appear so desolate? Well the secret is post-production. The power of erasing is what led to this eerie, yet alluring, timelapse videos of empty American cities.

Stay tuned for more Empty American cities in this ingenious new timelapse series, Empty America

Empty America: San Francisco

Empty America: Seattle

Empty America: New York

Empty America: Washington, DC

Making a Vision Become a Reality

Behind-the-scenes

#AlaskaTLF | Daring to Live Off-the-Grid

I’ve spent the entire day running errands throughout Denver. If you’ve never been to Denver, Colorado before, then you truly won’t understand how massive the city is. Not just the downtown part, but the entire makeup of Denver is well spread out. I started off in the suburbs of Centennial, Colorado and ended up driving to the foothills of Lakewood and Highlands Ranch.

Being back in Colorado is a culture shock in comparison to being in the DC Metropolitan region, but it’s refreshing. Everywhere I go I see Natural Grocery stores, and I’ve been able to enjoy shopping at Sprouts (it used to be Sunflowers Market). The atmosphere of “going-green” and living a healthy life-style is so addicting, and it’s got me wondering about an even further extreme — living off-the-grid.

The phrase “living off-the-grid” may sound entirely new, but it’s a concept that, of course, has roots with the Amish individuals within our country. The idea of a simpler life is the premise of taking that huge step to not just to minimize human foot prints with hints of recycling, but to live off-the-grid and rely completely on a self-sustainable lifestyle. I’ve had interactions with a few folks here in Colorado contemplating the idea or slowly working towards it, but the most exposure I’ve had to living off-the-grid is Discovery Channel’s hit show, Alaska: The Last Frontier.

Prior to moving to Colorado and currently living in an Homestead: Extended Stay hotel, I had never paid much attention to the (apparently) popular Discovery Channel show, Alaska: The Last Frontier. But since this hotel has limited programming because their choice provider is DISH, I’ve been watching a lot of the Discovery Shows that are based in Alaska; Gold Rush is one of the shows I’ve come to love. But if you really want to experience rural Alaska and how to survive, then you’ll need to tune into and follow the Twitter musings of #AlaskaTLF.

The show provides an exceptional perspective on living off-the-grid and how the Kilcher family survives on (and off) the homestead. The two generations of the Kilcher family, which live on a 600-acre homestead outside the rural Alaskan town of Homer, find a sense of meaning/existence on living off-the-grid, which essentially includes: limited contact with the outside world (except for the camera crew), no running water, no electricity, and “spend[ing] the limited months of summer and fall gardening, hunting and fishing for food, gathering supplies from the land, and safeguarding their animals in preparation for surviving the harsh Alaskan winter” (Discovery Channel).

If you thought living off-the-grid seemed like an impossible-harsh reality, imagine trying to achieve that lifestyle in the harsh winters of Alaska. Of course, the limited summer months are prime for growing and prepping supplies, but once the winter hits, the Kilcher’s are in for dark days and nights with freezing temperatures.

Even though the family faces the minuscule, sometimes gigantic, trials and tribulations off living-off-the grid, it does seem that the lifestyle has kept the close-knit family going for two generations. As I watch the show I get a sense of the bond they have for one another, and I get to see Otto Kilcher share with his son (who is married and lives on the homestead) survival skills that he can use for the next generation of Kilcher homestead residents.

As I continue to watch the second season of the show, I do ask myself whether or not I have the guts to ever try living off-the-grid. Could I do it? Sure, if I was in a nice rural location, preferably an island and I was surrounded by loved ones. But if it was somewhere cold like Alaska, then no, I couldn’t live off-the-grid. But wait, I have to give up electricity too…right? Well then, no I wouldn’t want to have that lifestyle. I love the power of being connected to a global community via the web. And I hope to expand on that idea and begin to go abroad and experience other cultures. So the honest answer to the question of to live or not to live off-the-grid, would be a simple no.

Not everyone has it in them to make that drastic change, but I do think we can all aspire to live healthier lifestyles, be more environmentally conscious, and find an environment that we can sustain a happy and healthy life with the ones we love. You don’t have to have a homestead like the Kilcher family, but even the idea of co-housing is something worth looking into; so many alternative lifestyles and living arrangements that fulfill the desire for community and sustainability.

If I had to live off-the-grid, I’d want to live in this eco-friendly home!

So my question, to all those who run across this blog or perhaps are considering living off-the-grid, do you think you can do it? I’d love to hear your thoughts. :)

Next Time You’re in Nebraska, Stop By King Kong for Gyros, Phillies, and Huge Burgers!

Whew, it feels so good to finally lay down, put my headphones on, and blog away. You may have noticed a lack of posts the past few days, and the reason being is I’ve been driving across the country; long four day drive from Maryland to Denver, Colorado.

I wasn’t alone on my journey. My mom and dad drove the truck with all our furniture in it, and I followed behind them in the car. So basically every single day I drove about 8-10 hours, with only a few short stops for rest. Yeah, sounds exhausting…and it really was. In the midst of the trip, so much stuff happened, including the headlights going out on the car. Even when we replaced the bulbs at Walmart, they still couldn’t figure out what was wrong. So at night time, I had to hold the brights on (switch wouldn’t stay on by itself) for about 2-3 hours. I drove with one hand, and boy I was so over it!

This wasn’t my first time going across the country on a massive road trip. Most of my life has been spent driving/moving back and forth from Colorado to Maryland, with short stays in Virginia and my birthplace, Columbus, Ohio.

So it wasn’t my first cross-country roadtrip, but it was my first time eating at King Kong in Lincoln, Nebraska. You heard that correct, a restaurant named King Kong. Awesome, right? So here is the situation, basically right off of i-80 you’ll spot this huge gorilla in the air and below it is a sign that says it all. Yup, the sign lets you know that not only can you get gyros, but they have phillies, steaks, and burgers! And not just a small burger, nope, you get a KING KONG BURGER. Seriously, the burger is massive!

Sadly, I didn’t take a picture of the burger my dad ate, but I did take a picture of my gyro. And I must say, it was absolutely delish! The last good gyro I had was from this cool food truck in Manhattan, and since then I haven’t had a pretty good one. Hey, some of them food trucks can really throw down and the food taste better than restaurants. Sometimes, not all. Some food trucks suck!

Anyways, so was it worth driving through Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illionois, Iowa, and Nebraska just to stop by King Kong for some delicious food? HELL YES! It’s so worth the drive. King Kong is awesome! And the decor of the restaurant has vintage King Kong posters, stuff apes hanging from the ceiling, and in front of the restaurant are mini King Kong statues. The entire restaurant is truly an experience!

So next time you’re in Nebraska, stop by King Kong for some good mood food!

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Pure New Zealand | Awesome New Theatrical Trailer for ‘The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey’

It’s safe to assume that most people have a dream destination they’d like to visit (or enjoy visiting.) Most people have narrowed down their list to one (or a few) places they’d love to visit, but my list keeps growing by the day. But after seeing the new theatrical trailer for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, I’m convinced even more about my decision to go to New Zealand next summer.

Those close to me (which are a select few) know that my dream place to visit (maybe even live) is New Zealand. I first fell in love with it actually by watching Rocket Power back in the day, but then I did some research and realized the cartoon couldn’t even capture the full awesomeness that New Zealand offers.

It’s seems like the ultimate place to go for adventure, and I’m craving an adventure, so hopefully next summer I will make my first trip abroad to New Zealand.

I’m young, single, and getting ready to graduate college, so I want to use the next few years to travel. For years I’ve talked about traveling the world, but my main desire is to experience 100% Pure New Zealand.  I want to take it all in: the sights, the Maori culture, the water activities, the arts, wine, and LOTR. Yes, I want to visit all the sites where LOTR was filmed, and I even want to visit the Home of Hobbiton which is featured in the upcoming Peter Jackson film The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.

There is just so much to do in New Zealand and my goal is to actually do that next summer. I want to kayak along the lakes and just let the beauty of sublime nature surround me. I want to just relax on one of the beaches and read a good book. I want to explore the Franz Josef Glacier and have an exciting hike that is truly worth of some instagram moments. I want to go zip-lining. I want to swim with dolphins. See, I could go on and on about all the things I want to do in NZ. And you know what, I’m going to do every last thing I’ve mentioned and even more!

Ah, I can’t wait! I’m excited about seeing The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and I’m excited aboutfinally starting to travel abroad. Before I go to New Zealand, I’m going to take a trip to Hawaii in the Spring, but boy, once summer hits, I’m going to set my sights on Oceania. Might even make my way to Australia. :)

 

 

NYC, My Artistic Soul Craves You

My weekends typically consist of listening to some great house in DC, but this past weekend I decided to to do something a little different. Of course house was still involved (great road-trip music,) but instead of going out dancing, my best friend and I took a trip up to New York.

I hadn’t been to New York since 2007 (my last visit before I left the DMV and moved to Denver, Colorado.) Prior to my 2007 visit to my aunt’s house in Mt. Vernon, I had been to New York a few other times, including a three day trip when I was in 8th grade. Those three days staying in a hotel in the city, sightseeing, and seeing Beauty and the Beast on were Broadway ended up being a great experience, but this time in NYC I experienced the city with a new perspective; a mature view fueled by a desire to create and embrace an eccentric expression of self.

After attempting to score a job or some gigs in DC doing the typical “bureaucratic” work, I realized that at the end of the day I am more keen to being a bohemian urban hipster that works in a creative environment. What does that mean? Well, it essentially means I’ve made some plans (which I will unveil in the coming months) to pursue a career that allows my creativity to flourish.

My recent decision is one of the reasons why I wanted to visit New York and soak up the creativity. Every time I visit New York I always come away with vibrant inspiration. Of course in Mt. Vernon their isn’t much of an avant-garde vibe, but that is easily solved by hoping on the Pelham train and heading down to Grand Central Station. The moment you switch over to the subway, you’re hit by masses of people with so many unique characteristics: hipsters, skinny models, chiseled men with Adonis-like sculpted bodies, eccentric folks with piercings + crazy hair, flamboyant fashionistas, and so many other peoples that can’t even fit into one category.

People are always in their own zone in New York, which can of course be an indication of the “rudeness” you experience. Yes, some people can be very rude (especially the uber high-maintenance women,) but while visiting NYC this time I actually didn’t encounter too much absurbd rudeness. I mean yes, people rarely say excuse me (especially in the crowded comic book store + walking down Fifth ave,) but the lack of social-barrier-breaching is expected.

Even though it’s overpopulated, I don’t hate NYC. I just hate how expensive it is to live there. I had such envy as we walked through the Village and saw so many people just chilling on the stoop of their brownstone. We even saw a fashion shoot taking place, which is actually one of the reasons why we came to NYC. Not for a fashion shoot, but so my bestie could get inspired to do more street photography and fashion photography.

NYC is a city of inspiration. Even if you don’t go shopping or clubbing, you can solemnly be inspired by the city + people.

I could go on and on about my trip, but I’d basically just be explaining to everyone what you already know; New York City is one of the best cities in the world. Yet, it doesn’t mean I want to live there after graduating. I have a few more places to go and education to soak up before I could move to NYC and deal with the stress of paying rent and riding the crazy crowded subway every single day.

However, after seeing so much creativity and unique fashion (especially in the Uniqlo store,) I walked away with two new truths.

1. ) Time to go ahead and embrace my artistic personality and express it even more so with my fashion. Whether it’s bohemian digs or vintage chic mixed with a urban pop art vibe, I just need to go on a little style exploration.

2.) After seeing so many artistic men of all different races, I realize that perhaps the reason my dating life (I do date a lot) has been filled with me getting bored (happens a lot, some guys just truly bore me) with guys can be attributed to the type of guy I’m choosing. I need to go back to dating artistic souls: musicians, writers, artists, photographers, designers, etc. Men that can relate to my artistic struggles and appreciate my eccentric arty mind. Nerds are cool, but creative men seem to truly inspire me (and turn me on.) ;)

So there you have it folks, that is just a little bit (believe it or not, I could write more) of my weekend in NYC and the inspiration I derived from it. I plan on visiting soon, but I won’t be moving there anytime soon. I’ve got some things do accomplish first before I could consider picking up my life and moving to NYC.